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What is a Material Contract Breach? Definition

What is a Material Contract Breach? Definition

In business, a contract is an agreement between two parties to provide or receive goods, services, or payment. Each party agrees to do (or not do) something in exchange for the other party’s actions. However, sometimes one party doesn’t uphold their end of the agreement. This is called a material contract breach, and it can have major consequences for businesses. In this blog post, we will explore what a material contract breach is, its definition, and some examples.

What is a Contract?

When one party to a contract fails to perform their obligations under the agreement, it is considered a material breach of contract. This can occur when one party does not fulfill their duty in a timely manner, does not complete the work required, or otherwise does not meet the terms of the agreement. A material breach can also occur if one party makes it impossible for the other party to perform their obligations. If a material breach occurs, the non-breaching party may be able to terminate the contract and seek damages.

What is a Breach of Contract?

When one party to a contract fails to perform its obligations under the agreement, it is said to have breached the contract. A breach of contract can occur when one party refuses to perform its duties, doesn’t complete them in a timely manner, or doesn’t perform them at all. The non-breaching party may then choose to sue for damages or cancel the contract.

Types of Breach of Contract

There are two types of contract breaches: material and immaterial. A material breach of contract is a failure to perform any significant or important obligation under the contract. An immaterial breach of contract, on the other hand, is a failure to perform a minor obligation that does not go to the heart of the agreement.

A material breach of contract can occur when one party fails to deliver on their promise, such as when a contractor fails to complete work by the agreed-upon deadline. A material breach can also occur when one party significantly changes the terms of the agreement without the consent of the other party, such as when a supplier unilaterally raises prices.

An immaterial breach of contract is typically less serious than a material breach and may not give rise to legal action. For example, if a party fails to provide detailed specifications in an agreement, this would likely be considered an immaterial breach.

Examples of Breach of Contract

When one party to a contract fails to perform their obligations under the agreement, it is considered a breach of contract. This can happen in a number of ways, including:

-One party fails to meet their obligations outlined in the contract
-One party doesn’t make timely payments
-One party doesn’t hold up their end of the bargain in terms of quality or quantity
-One party doesn’t provide the agreed upon services
-The contract itself is illegal or void

Remedies for Breach of Contract

When one party to a contract fails to perform their obligations under the agreement, it is considered a breach of contract. This can happen for a number of reasons, including failure to meet deadlines, provide the agreed-upon services or product, or not paying the other party. If you have been the victim of a material breach of contract, there are a few remedies available to you.

First, you can try to work out an agreement with the breaching party. This is often the quickest and easiest way to resolve the issue. If you are unable to reach an agreement, you can file a lawsuit against the breaching party. In some cases, you may be able to recover damages if you win your case. Finally, you can cancel the contract and find another company to work with. This is usually only an option if the breach is material and has caused you significant harm.

Conclusion

A material contract breach is a violation of any important term in a contract that goes to the heart of the agreement between the parties. The breach must be significant enough to cause one party undue hardship or financial loss, and it must be shown that the breaching party knew or should have known that their actions would result in such harm. In order to prove a material contract breach, the aggrieved party must show that they have suffered damages as a direct result of the other party’s actions. If you believe you have experienced a material contract breach, it is important to speak with an experienced attorney who can help you understand your legal rights and options.

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