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What is Machine Learning (ML)? Definition

What is Machine Learning (ML)? Definition

Machine learning is a subset of artificial intelligence (AI) that provides computers with the ability to learn and improve from experience without being explicitly programmed to do so. The term “machine learning” was coined in 1959 by Arthur Samuel, an American computer scientist who pioneered the field of AI. Machine learning algorithms build models based on data that can be used to make predictions or recommendations. For example, a machine learning algorithm could be used to predict whether a customer will churn (cancel their subscription), or what products a customer might want to buy. Machine learning is usually divided into three types: supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning.

What is Machine Learning?

Machine learning is a subset of artificial intelligence that deals with the creation of algorithms that can learn and improve on their own. Machine learning is mainly used to make predictions or recommendations based on data. For example, machine learning can be used to predict what products a customer is likely to buy, or which ads a consumer is most likely to click on.

Supervised learning

Supervised learning is a type of machine learning that uses labeled data to train models. Labeled data is a dataset that has been manually labeled by humans. This label tells the model what the correct output should be for a given input. The model can then be used to make predictions on new, unlabeled data. Supervised learning is the most common type of machine learning and is used for tasks such as image classification, object detection, and facial recognition.

Unsupervised learning

Unsupervised learning is a type of machine learning that does not require labeled data. Instead, it relies on algorithms to find patterns in data. This can be used to cluster data points or to find anomalies.

Reinforcement learning

Reinforcement learning is a type of machine learning that is concerned with how software agents ought to take actions in an environment so as to maximize some notion of cumulative reward. The agent receives rewards for performing correct actions and penalties for performing incorrect actions. The aim is for the agent to learn by trial and error which actions yield the most reward, so that it can eventually perform optimally.

Important ML algorithms

There are many important machine learning algorithms, but some of the most popular and well-known ones include:

-Decision trees
-Support vector machines
-Neural networks

Each of these algorithms has its own strengths and weaknesses, so it’s important to choose the right one for your specific needs. For example, decision trees are good for classification problems, while support vector machines are better for regression problems. Neural networks can be used for both types of problems, but they are more difficult to train.

Benefits of ML

There are many benefits of machine learning (ML). One benefit is that it can be used to automate decision-making processes. For example, if you are a loan officer at a bank, you may use ML to automate the loan approval process. This can help you make decisions faster and more accurately.

Another benefit of ML is that it can help you make predictions. For example, if you are a doctor, you may use ML to predict how a patient will respond to a new medication. This can help you choose the best treatment for your patients.

ML can also help you improve your products and services. For example, if you are a retail store, you may use ML to predict what customers want. This can help you stock your shelves with the items that customers are most likely to buy.

Finally, ML can help you save time and money. For example, if you are a manufacturer, you may use ML to predict when machines will break down. This can help you schedule maintenance before problems occur.

Potential risks of ML

When it comes to data, more is not always better. In fact, sometimes too much data can be a bad thing – especially when it’s not properly curated. This is one of the potential risks of machine learning (ML).

If you train an ML algorithm on a dataset that is too large, or that contains too many features, it can lead to overfitting. This means that the algorithm will learn the noise in the data, rather than the signal. This can lead to poor performance when you try to apply the algorithm to new data.

Another potential risk of ML is bias. This can happen if the training data is not representative of the real-world data that the algorithm will be applied to. For example, if you are trying to build a model that predicts whether or not a loan will be repaid, and your training data only includes loans that were repaid, your model will be biased against loans that defaulted.

Finally, ML algorithms can be susceptible to adversarial examples. These are inputs that have been specifically designed to fool the algorithm into making a wrong prediction. For example, imagine you are training an image classification algorithm to identify animals in photos. An adversarial example might be a photo of a zebra with some strategically placed stripes that cause the algorithm to misclassify it as a giraffe.

Adversarial examples can be used maliciously, for instance, to trick self-driving cars into thinking there are no pedestrians on

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