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What is After-The-Fact Purchase Order? Definition

What is After-The-Fact Purchase Order? Definition

A purchase order (PO) is a document that authorizes a buyer to purchase products or services from a seller. After-the-fact purchase orders are created after the goods or services have been received or the work has been completed. While this may seem like an unnecessary step, after-the-fact purchase orders serve an important purpose. They help buyers keep track of spending, ensure that they are being invoiced correctly, and help sellers keep track of inventory levels. If you’re not sure what an after-the-fact purchase order is or how it can benefit your business, read on for a complete definition and explanation.

What is an After-The-Fact Purchase Order?

An after-the-fact purchase order is a document that is created after the goods or services have been received. The purchase order includes the vendor’s name, the date of purchase, the amount paid, and a description of the goods or services. This type of purchase order is often used when the buyer does not have time to create a purchase order before the goods or services are received.

The Different Types of After-The-Fact Purchase Orders

There are different types of after-the-fact purchase orders, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. The most common type of after-the-fact purchase order is the blanket purchase order. This type of purchase order allows you to make multiple purchases up to a certain dollar amount without having to create a new purchase order for each individual transaction.

Another type of after-the-fact purchase order is the contract purchase order. This type of purchase order is used when you have a contract with a vendor for a specific product or service. The advantage of this type of purchase order is that it can help you avoid paying penalties for breaking the contract.

The last type of after-the-fact purchase order is the open purchase order. This type of purchase order does not have a specified dollar amount and can be used for any number of transactions. The disadvantage of this type of purchase order is that it can be easily abused by employees who make unauthorized purchases.

The Pros and Cons of an After-The-Fact Purchase Order

An after-the-fact purchase order (PO) is a purchase order that is created and finalized after the goods or services have already been received. This can happen for a variety of reasons, such as when an emergency purchase is made without time to create a formal PO or when the vendor does not require a PO upfront.

There are both pros and cons to using an after-the-fact PO. On the plus side, it can be a quick and easy way to buy needed supplies without jumping through all the hoops of creating a formal PO. It can also be helpful in situations where you may not be able to get a PO from your company in time, such as if you’re making an emergency purchase.

However, there are also some downsides to using an after-the-fact PO. One potential downside is that you may not be able to get the same terms from your supplier as you would if you had placed a formal PO upfront. This could include things like discounts or extended payment terms. Additionally, it can be difficult to track spending when using after-the-fact POs, which can lead to problems with budgeting and accounting.

How to Create an After-The-Fact Purchase Order

An after-the-fact purchase order (ATFPO) is a purchase order that is created after the goods or services have been received. This type of purchase order is typically used when the buyer does not have enough money in their account to cover the full cost of the purchase, so they create an ATFPO to get reimbursed for the expenses.

There are a few steps that you need to follow in order to create an ATFPO. First, you will need to gather all of the necessary documentation, including receipts, invoices, and any other supporting documentation. Next, you will need to fill out a purchase order form and submit it to your supervisor for approval. Once your supervisor approves the purchase order, you will be able to submit it for payment.

How to Use an After-The-Fact Purchase Order

If you’ve ever been in a situation where you’ve needed to make a purchase but didn’t have the budget for it upfront, then you know how frustrating it can be. Fortunately, there’s a solution: after-the-fact purchase orders.

After-the-fact purchase orders (ATFPOs) are essentially retroactive purchase orders. That means that they’re used to cover purchases that have already been made. ATFPOs are commonly used in situations where budgeting constraints or other unforeseen circumstances prevented the initial purchase from being made with a standard purchase order.

While ATFPOs may seem like a hassle, they can actually be quite helpful in managing your finances and keeping your business organized. Here’s a quick guide on how to use an after-the-fact purchase order:

1. Determine what needs to be purchased. The first step is to identify the item or items that need to be purchased. This is important because you’ll need to include this information on the ATFPO form.

2. Find the vendor invoice. Once you know what needs to be purchased, you’ll need to find the vendor invoice for the purchase. This is important because you’ll need the invoice number in order to fill out the ATFPO form.

3. Fill out the ATFPO form. The next step is to fill out the ATFPO form. You’ll need to include information such as the invoice number, purchase date, vendor

Alternatives to the After-The-Fact Purchase Order

Before we dive into alternatives to the after-the-fact purchase order, let’s first understand what it is. After-the-fact purchase orders (also known as “backdated purchase orders”) are purchase orders that are created after the goods or services have already been received. This can happen for a number of reasons, such as when an organization doesn’t have a purchasing process in place, or when employees make purchases without going through the proper channels.

While after-the-fact purchase orders may seem like a convenient way to get around the purchasing process, they can actually lead to a number of problems down the line. For one, they can create accounting and auditing issues. Additionally, after-the-fact purchase orders can also put your organization at risk of fraud and abuse.

So what are some alternatives to after-the-fact purchase orders? Below are a few options to consider:

1. Require employees to get approval before making purchases: One way to avoid after-the-fact purchase orders is to require employees to get approval before making any purchases. This way, you can ensure that all purchases are made through the proper channels and that there is a paper trail for every transaction.

2. Set up an online purchasing system: Another option is to set up an online purchasing system that allows employees to easily and quickly make purchases through approved vendors. This will help streamline the purchasing process and reduce the chances of errors or fraud.

Conclusion

After-the-fact purchase orders are a type of purchasing and accounting system where transactions are processed after they have occurred. This can cause problems because it can be difficult to track down the original invoices and receipts, and it can also lead to errors in the accounting records. However, after-the-fact purchase orders can also be beneficial because they allow businesses to make purchases without having to go through the lengthy and complicated process of getting approval beforehand. Ultimately, whether or not an after-the-fact purchase order is right for your business depends on your specific needs and preferences.

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