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What is anchoring and how is it used in contract negotiation?

oboloo Articles

What is anchoring and how is it used in contract negotiation?

What is anchoring and how is it used in contract negotiation?

Contract negotiation is an important part of any business. It’s a complex and challenging process that requires clear communication, trust and understanding between parties. But even with the best intentions, negotiating can quickly become difficult—especially when one party feels like they’re not getting enough out of a deal. Enter anchoring—an effective negotiation strategy used to influence the outcome of contract negotiations. In this blog post, we’ll discuss what anchoring is and how it’s used in contract negotiation to achieve successful outcomes for both parties involved.

What is anchoring?

Anchoring is a cognitive bias that describes the tendency for people to rely too heavily on the first piece of information they receive (the “anchor”) when making decisions.

In negotiation, anchoring can be used as a tactic to influence the other party’s decision-making. For example, if you are selling a car, you might start by quoting a high price, which the buyer will then use as a reference point when deciding how much to pay.

Of course, there is always the risk that the other party will simply walk away from the negotiation if they feel that the anchor is unreasonable. Therefore, it is important to use anchoring carefully and only when you are reasonably confident that it will work in your favor.

How is anchoring used in contract negotiation?

Anchoring is the process of using a reference point to influence the other party’s decision-making in negotiation. The anchor can be any number or value, but is typically the first offer made by one party during negotiations. This offer then acts as a reference point, or “anchor,” against which the other party will measure their own subsequent offers.

The goal of anchoring is to influence the other party’s perception of what is fair or reasonable, in hopes of getting them to agree to a deal that is more favorable to the anchoring party. In many cases, the anchoring party may not even have their own best interests at heart – they may simply be trying to exploit the biases of the other negotiator.

Nonetheless, anchoring is a common and effective tactic used in contract negotiation, and can be employed in a variety of ways. For example, an employer might low-ball their initial salary offer to an employee, in order to get them to accept a lower salary than they would have otherwise. Or, a real estate agent might inflate their initial estimate of a home’s value, in order to get the sellers to accept a lower offer from buyers.

In general, there are two main types of anchors that can be used in negotiation: static anchors and moving anchors. Static anchors are typically numerical values, like prices or salaries, while moving anchors are based on something that can change over time, like deadlines or delivery dates.

The benefits of anchoring

Anchoring is a negotiation technique that can be used to influence the outcome of a negotiation. The basic idea behind anchoring is to start with a high offer or demand in order to “anchor” the negotiation around that starting point. The hope is that the other party will either accept the high offer or counter with a much lower offer, which would still be closer to the initial high offer than if no anchoring had been used.

There are a number of benefits that can be gained from using anchoring in contract negotiation. First, it can help you to secure a better overall deal by starting from a position of strength. Secondly, it can help to create an opening for further negotiation by getting the other party to counter your high initial offer. Finally, it can help to focus the other party on the key issues at stake in the negotiation, which can lead to a more efficient and productive negotiation process overall.

The drawbacks of anchoring

Anchoring can be a disadvantage in negotiation because it may cause the negotiators to focus too much on the initial offer and fail to explore other options. Additionally, people tend to overestimate the value of their ownanchored offer, which can lead to an impasse in negotiations.

How to effectively use anchoring in contract negotiation

Anchoring is a negotiation technique that can be used to influence the other party in a contract negotiation. The idea is to start with a high number or low number, depending on what you are trying to achieve, and then use that number as a reference point during the negotiation.

For example, let’s say you are trying to sell your car for $5,000. You could start by Anchoring yourself at $7,500, knowing that the other person will likely counter with a lower number. By doing this, you have effectively increased the chances of selling your car closer to your asking price.

Conclusion

Anchoring is a powerful tool in contract negotiations, as it can help you to reach agreements that are beneficial and fair for both parties. By setting realistic expectations from the outset and maintaining focus on important goals throughout the process, anchoring allows negotiators to come away with deals that leave everyone satisfied. While there may be some bumps in the road along the way, using an effective anchoring strategy during negotiations can help ensure success in coming to mutually beneficial agreements.

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